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Most Popular Spread Betting Markets

Football

Football is the most popular sport in spread betting and also contains two of our most popular markets.

Both markets are ‘goals’ related, the first being supremacy (the number of goals we think one team is better than the other) and the second being total match goals (which is exactly that). Other goals related markets include shirt numbers and player goal minutes. If you didn’t have an opinion on a goals related market in a game there are a host of other markets relating to bookings, corners, times and the performance of individual players whether you want to back them to do well or badly.

Our bet explanations below provide an in-depth guide to our most popular football markets.

Football - Supremacy

This is a spread betting market predicting a team's dominance over their opposition. We will predict how many goals a team will beat the other by.

For example we might make Arsenal favourites to beat Tottenham by 0.1-0.3 goals. Therefore, if you think Arsenal will win you might bet high (buy) at 0.3 for the stake of your choice, in this case, £50 a goal.

If Arsenal were to win the game 4-1, their winning margin (make-up) would be 3 goals. Had you placed your spread bet high at 0.3 you would have made 2.7 times your stake or £135. Here's how the calculation works: (3 - 0.3) x your stake = 2.7 x £50 = £135.

But, if Tottenham had won the game 1-0, the same bet would have lost you 1.3 times your stake. Again, here's how the calculation works: (-1 - 0.3) x your stake = -1.3 x £50 = -£65.

Football - Total Goals

This market is based on the total number of goals scored in any given match by both teams.

We might predict that the Manchester United v Barcelona game will yield 2.7-3.0 goals. Therefore if you think that the game will be high scoring you would bet high at 3.0 for the stake of your choice, in this case, £50 a goal.

If Barcelona were to win the game 4-1, the total goals scored in the game would be 5. Had you gone high on Total Goals at 3.0 you would have made 2 times your stake: (5 -3.0) x your stake = 2 x £50 = £100. But if the game had finished 0-0, the same bet would have lost you 3 times your stake: (0 - 3.0) x your stake = -3 x £50 = -£150.

Football - Goal Scorers Shirt Numbers

This market is based on the aggregate number of shirt numbers for all the goal scorers in a match. A 1-1 draw with players wearing shirt numbers 14 and 10 scoring the goals would result in shirt numbers making up at 24 points.

For a match between Spurs and Liverpool, we might price shirt numbers at 36 - 39. So if you expect a few goals you would bet high at 39 for the stake of your choice, let’s say £10 a point.

If Spurs were to win the game 2-1, with number 7 scoring both goals for Spurs and shirt number 10 netting Liverpool's only chance, the final result would be 24 points (7 + 7 + 10). Had you gone high Shirt Numbers at 39 you would have lost 15 times your stake, in this case £10 per point: (39 - 24) x your stake = 15 x £10 = -£150. But if you had gone low at 36, the same bet would have won you 12 times your stake: (36 - 24) x your stake = 12 x £10 = £120.

Football - Total Bookings

How many cards will the referee show during a match? Our simple scoring system allocates 10 points for a yellow card (maximum one per player) and 25 points for a red card. If a player gets a yellow card and then a second yellow card (i.e. red card for two yellows) then he is awarded 10 + 25 = 35 points.

As an example we might offer a bookings prediction of 44-48 points in a Manchester United v Manchester City derby match. This means that we think there will be somewhere between 4 or 5 yellow cards shown. If there were 3 yellow cards and 1 red, the result would be 55 points.

Had you bought (gone high) on Bookings at 48 you would have won 7 times your stake, in this case £10 per point: (55 - 48) x your stake = 7 x £10 = £70. But if you had gone low at 44, you would have lost 11 times your stake: (44 - 55) x your stake = -11 x £10 = -£110.

Football - Total Corners

This market is based on the total number of corners taken by both sides in a game.

Take an international between old rivals Scotland and England. We might offer a prediction for corners of 10-11.

If a very attacking game had led to 15 corners and you had gone high at 11 for £10 per corner, you would have won 4 times your stake: (15 - 11) x your stake = 4 x £10 = £40. But if you had gone low at 10, you would have lost 5 times your stake: (10 - 15) x your stake = -5 x £10 = -£50.

Football - Time of First Goal

How many minutes will elapse before either team scores? In this football betting market we also make predictions on the time of the first home goal and first away goal. The maximum result is 90 minutes (injury time does not count).

In an international friendly between Ireland and Holland, we might predict that the first match goal would be scored after approximately half an hour, hence our quote of 28-31 minutes.

If the first goal came in the 38th minute and you had gone high at 31 minutes for £5 per minute, you would have won 7 times your stake: (38 - 31) x your stake = 7 x £5 = £35. But if you had gone low at 28 minutes for the same stake, you would have lost 10 times your stake: (28 - 38) x your stake = -10 x £5 = -£50.

Football - Total Goal Minutes

This is a very volatile market and care should be taken when placing bets. You must use your judgement to estimate the total aggregate time of all goals scored in the game. Goals scored in the 44th and 82nd minute would add up to 126 total goal minutes.

Take a match between Manchester United and Arsenal. We might predict 125-135 total goal minutes.

If Arsenal won the game 3-0 and the goals came in the 7th, 23rd and 90th minutes the result would be 120 minutes. Had you gone low on goal minutes at 125 (expecting few goals) you would have won 5 times your stake, in this case £1 a minute: (125 - 120) x your stake = 5 x £1 = £5. But if total goal minutes had added up to 134, the same bet would have lost you 9 times your stake: (125 - 134) x your stake = -9 x £1 = -£19.

Football - Team Performance

We offer a 'Team Performance' market for both teams for most live televised matches where the teams are awarded points based upon particular criteria. A team scores points as follows: Win = 25 points, draw = 10, goal scored = 15, clean sheet = 10, corner = 3, yellow card = -5 and red card = -15.

As an example for a match between Aston Villa and Arsenal, we may price Arsenal's performance at 44-48 points. If you fancied Arsenal to underperform against a solid Villa defence you would bet low on their performance at 44.

If a boring 0-0 draw followed, in which Arsenal managed only two corners and collected two yellow cards, Arsenal's Team Performance would have made up at just 16 points (10 for the draw, 10 for the clean sheet, 6 for 2 corners but minus 10 for 2 yellow cards).

So, had you gone low on Arsenal's performance at 44 you would have won 28 times your stake, in this case £5: (44 - 16) x your stake = 28 x £5 = £140. But if Arsenal's performance had resulted in 62 points, the same spread bet would have lost you 18 times your stake: (44 - 62) x your stake = -18 x £5 = -£90.

Football - Player Performance

Our 'Player Performance' market is very much like our Team Performance market, only it is based on how an individual player performs in any given match. The scoring system is: Goal scored = 25 points (note the goal scorer as awarded by the TV coverage), goal assist = 10, shot on target = 5, forcing a corner = 3, free kick won = 3 (note includes penalties), passing to own player in opposition half = 2, free kick conceded = -3, yellow card = -10, red card = -25.

We normally offer Player Performances on three or four players from each team.

Our Player Performance quote for Andy Carroll before kick-off of a particular game might be 40-45 points. If you believed he is an over-rated player likely to be outplayed by his marker, you might place your spread bet low at 40 for £2. A drab performance from Carroll might result in a Player Performance make-up of just 17 points. Had you gone low on Carroll's performance at 40 you would have won 23 times your stake: (40 - 17) x your stake = 23 x £2 = £46. If, however, his attacking style had led you to bet high on his performance at 45, you would have lost 28 times your stake: (17 - 45) x your stake = -28 x £2 = -£56.

Football - Individual Player - Goal Minutes

This market is based on the total minutes of all the goals scored by an individual player in a match. So, if a player nets two goals in a match, one in the 34th minute and the other in the 68th minute, his result would be 102 minutes (34+68). If a player fails to score the make-up is 0 minutes.

We might predict Goal Minutes for Wayne Rooney in a match of 17-20.

If you thought an out-of-sorts Rooney might not score in the game, you would bet low or sell his goal minutes at 17. If Rooney had scored in the 7th minute, you would have won 10 times your stake, in this case £2 per minute: (17 - 7) x your stake = 10 x £2 = £20. If, however, he scored in the 33rd minute, you would have lost 16 times your stake: (17 - 33) x your stake = 16 x £2 = -£32.

Rugby

Spread betting on rugby offers a greater variety of markets than any other form of betting. We have long term markets like tournament indices and season points, along with match markets such as supremacy, total points and shirt numbers; to name but a few.

Supremacy is our prediction on how many points better we think one team is than the other. We don’t always get it right and this market can make up negative, where the underdog ends up beating the team we expected to win.

Time of first try is exactly that; our prediction on when the first try will be. For this market we measure the game in minutes, from 1 to 80. If there were no tries in the match the market makes up at 80.

Rugby - Tournament / Championship Index

For all major rugby union events (Aviva Premiership, Six Nations, World Cup, etc.) we offer a market based on how individual teams will perform. Points are awarded to the teams who finish the event in the top positions. For example, in the Six Nations Championship, we might award 60 points for the team who topped the final table, 40 points for the team which finishes second, 20 points for third, 10 points for 4th and 0 points for the others. This gives you the opportunity to predict not only how well a team will perform, but how badly they may do as well.

Let's look at an illustration. During a Six Nations Championship, we might reckon that England are favourites to win, this would be reflected in our prediction of 36-39 points (based on the points system outlined above). If you believed England are going to be pretty much unbeatable, you would place your spread bet high at 39, say for £5 per point. Had England ended up winning the Six Nations you would have won 21 times your stake: (60 - 39) x your stake = 21 x £5 = £105. Even if they had slipped up and finished second, you still would have made 1 times your stake: (40 - 39) x your stake = 1 x £5 = £5.

Rugby - Season Points

For this market we simply predict how many points each side will end up with at the conclusion of a season.

So for example at the beginning of the Aviva Premiership season we might predict that Leicester will finish with 69-71 points come the end of the season. If you believed they were primed for their best ever campaign, you would place your bet high at 71 for the stake of your choice, in this case perhaps £5 per point.

Had Leicester ended with 82 points, you would have made 11 times your stake: (82 - 71) x your stake = 11 x £5 = £55. However, had Leicester struggled during the season and only managed to finish with 61 points, the bet would have cost you 10 times your stake: (71 - 61) x your stake = 10 x £5 = -£50.

Rugby - Supremacy

In this market we predict how many points one team will beat the other by. This gives you the opportunity to support or oppose either team in any given match.

So, we might predict that England will beat France by 7-10 points. If you fancied England to beat France by a margin of more than 10 points you would bet high at 10 for the stake of your choice, in this case say £5 per point.

If it turned out to be a tight match, with England scraping home 11-6, the supremacy (winning margin) would be just 5 points. As a result you would have lost 5 times your stake: (5 - 10) x your stake = -5 x £5 = -£25. However, if England had romped home to win by 20 points you would have won 10 times your stake: (20 - 10) x your stake = 10 x £5 = £50.

Rugby - Total Points

For this market we simply predict the total number of points that will be scored in a rugby match.

Here's an example. For a match between Leicester and Saracens, we might reckon on a relatively free scoring game with plenty of points and, as a result, our total points prediction might be 56-59.

If you expected an open game, you would bet high at 59, for the stake of your choice, in this case say £5 per point. Had you been proved correct and the game had finished 42-28, a total of 70 points, you would have made 11 times your stake: (70 - 59) x your stake = 11 x £5 = £55. Had the game proved to be a relatively dour affair with a final result of 26-14 (and therefore a total of 40 points) then you would have lost 19 times your stake: (40 - 59) x your stake = -19 x £5 = -£145.

Rugby - Shirt Numbers

In this market we predict the aggregate number of the try scorers' shirt numbers in a match. For example, if numbers 13, 12 and 14 all score a try, the total shirt numbers would be 39.

Take a clash between England and France. We reckon this might well turn out to be a relatively attacking game with plenty of tries. As a result we might quote Total Shirt Numbers at 63-67.

If you expected a really open game with points being scored freely you might bet high at 67 for the stake of your choice, in this case, say £5 per point. If England had beaten France 48 - 19 with seven tries being scored, the shirt numbers might have added up to 83. As a result you would have made 16 times your stake: (83 - 67) x your stake = 16 x £5 = £80. But, if you had gone low at 63 for the same stake, your spread bet would have lost you 20 times your stake: (63 - 83) x your stake = -20 x £5 = -£100.

Rugby - Time of First Try

This is a bet on when the first try of a game will be scored, measured in minutes. If you were to bet low on the time of the first match try then ideally you would like a first minute score. However if there were no tries in the match then the make-up would be 80 (as in 80 minutes). We offer a market for the first match try (scored by either team) and separately for both individual teams.

For example, for a Six Nations match between Scotland and Italy, we predicted the first match try (by either side) would be scored after 18-21 minutes. If you were convinced the match would be deadlocked with no try for far longer than this you might bet high at 21 for say £5 per minute.

If the Scots only managed to break through the Italian defence to cross the line in the 27th minute then you would have won 6 times your stake: (27 - 21) x your stake = 6 x £5 = £30. However, if you had gone low at 18 minutes for the same stake, you would have lost 9 times your stake: (18 - 27) x your stake = -9 x £5 = -£45.

Horse Racing

We all struggle to pick winners in horse racing, but the beauty of spread betting is you can back horses to do badly as well as win. Not only that, we have a host of other markets related to winning distances, jockeys, starting prices etc, so you can place a bet on a race or a meeting without having to worry about finding that winner.

In our individual race indices we offer points to horses depending on where they finish. We also offer match bets between horses, where you can buy or sell the winning distance between two horses in a race regardless of whether or not one of them wins. Markets are available across a race meeting, the most popular of which being winning distances and favourites.

So as you can see spread betting offers plenty of alternatives to just trying to pick a winner. Our bet explanations below offer further guidance on our most popular racing markets.

Horse Racing - Winning Distances

This market, as the name suggests, is our prediction on the aggregate total of the winning margins of each race at a meeting. The maximum winning distance for a Flat race is set at 12 lengths while for a National Hunt race it is set at 30 lengths. This also applies should only one horse complete the race. Distances under a length are recorded as follows: Short head = 0.1 of a length, head = 0.2 of a length, neck = 0.3 of a length, half a length = 0.5 of a length, three-quarters of a length = 0.75 of a length.

Here's an example. At a jumps meeting at Aintree, we might price total winning distances at 64-69. As it had been raining non-stop for the previous two days, you might decide to place your spread bet high at 69 for say £2 per length, reasoning that heavy ground can often lead to big winning margins.

In the end the winning distances made up at 78 lengths. Had you gone high at 69 you would have won 9 times your stake: (69 - 78) x your stake = 9 x £2 = £18. But if winning distances had made up at only 60 lengths, the same bet would have lost you 9 times your stake: (60 - 69) x your stake = -9 x £2 = £18.

Horse Racing - Individual Race Index

This market is about the performance of horses in individual races, awarding points according to where they finish. The points structure varies according to how many runners there are in a race, so for races with 11 or less runners the points are as follows: 1st = 50 points, 2nd = 25, 3rd = 10, any other place = 0. Races with 12 or more runners taking part score as follows: 1st = 50 points, 2nd = 30, 3rd = 20, 4th = 10, any other place = 0.

This market gives you the opportunity to back or oppose a horse, something which a traditional fixed-odds betting market does not offer.

Here's how it works in practice. In the 2004 Derby we priced North Light at 9-12 points, reflecting our belief that he might well make the frame. If you had fancied him to do well, you might have bet high at 12 for say £2. The record books show North Light actually went on to win the race and therefore we allotted him 50 points. So, had you gone high at 12 you would have won 38 times your stake: (50 - 12) x your stake = 38 x £2 = £76. But, had North Light not finished in the frame he would have been awarded 0 points, so the same bet would have lost you 12 times your stake: (0 - 12) x your stake = -12 x £2 = -£24.

Horse Racing - Match Bets

We pick two horses in a race and predict what the distance between them will be when they cross the line. If you think one horse will beat another then you can place a bet on this market and it doesn't matter where in the field they finish - you are simply having a bet on their performance relative to each other. The maximum distances for the purpose of a match bet is 12 lengths in a Flat race and 15 lengths in a National Hunt race.

In the 2004 Oaks, we pitted Ouija Board against Sundrop in a match bet. We made Ouija Board favourite to finish ahead of Sundrop by between 0-1 lengths.

If you thought Ouija Board was a far classier filly you might have gone high on Ouija Board over Sundrop at 1 length for £5 per length.

In the end Sundrop trailed in 12 lengths behind Ouija Board. So, had you gone high on Ouija Board at 1 length, then your bet would have paid off to the tune of 11 times your stake: (12 - 1) x your stake =11 x £5 = £55. If, however, Sundrop had finished 5 lengths ahead, the same bet would have lost you 6 times your stake (5 lengths plus the 1 length you bought at): (-5 - 1) x your stake = -6 x £5 = -£30.

Note it does not matter where the horses finish in the context of the race: it is simply the distance between them that counts.

Horse Racing - Favourites Index

Have the horse racing betting experts got it right? How will the favourites perform in each race at a particular meeting? In this market a favourite is awarded 25 points for winning, 10 points for finishing second, 5 points for third and 0 points for any other place. In the event of a race starting with joint favourites, we take the favourite as being the horse with the lower race card number.

Let's look at an example. At an Ascot jumps card consisting of six races, our favourites prediction might be 56-60 points. If you had a good look at the form and decided that the favourites should perform better than we predicted, you might bet high (buy) at 60 for a stake of say £2.

At the end of the day, two of the favourites had won, two came second, one ran into third while the other was unplaced. On the basis of our scoring system, the result (make up) was 75. So, had you gone high at 60 you would have won 15 times your stake: (75 - 60) x your stake = 15 x £2 = £30. But, if the favourites index had made up at only 50 points, the same bet would have lost you 10 times your stake: (50 - 60) x your stake = -10 x £2 = -£20.

Horse Racing - Racing Post - Favourites Index

This is based on the same principle as the Favourites Index but the favourites are those printed first in the betting section below each race card in the Racing Post (i.e. the horses the Racing Post betting forecast predicts will start favourite). These horses are awarded points as follows: 1st = 25points, 2nd = 10, 3rd = 5, any other place = 0. If there are joint favourites the first named horse in the Racing Post is deemed to be the favourite.

Here's an example. In a race meeting at Lingfield, our opening prediction for Racing Post Favourites might be 66-70. If you studied the Racing Post and believed their favourites had a better chance than we predicted you would bet high (buy) at 70 for £2.

In the end two of the Racing Post favourites won, but none of the others made the frame. So, on the basis of our scoring system, the market made up at 50. Had you gone high at 70 you would have lost 20 times your stake: (50 - 70) x your stake = -20 x £2 = -£40. However, if the Racing Post favourites index had resulted in 85 points, the same bet would have won you 15 times your stake: (85 - 70) x your stake = 15 x £2 = £30.

Horse Racing - Jockey Index

For each race meeting we offer markets on how an individual jockey will perform. This is similar to the favourites markets with 25 points awarded for a winning ride, 10 for a second, 5 for a third and 0 points for any other place. If the jockey on whom the market is offered does not ride his intended mount in a race, but the horse still runs, then the horse's finishing position still counts as if it had been ridden by the named jockey.

Here's an example. At a meeting at Epsom, Jamie Spencer has six rides. We might predict that he will get between 41-44 points based on the scoring system above.

If you viewed his rides as particularly strong and believed he might have two winners with a good chance of others finishing in the frame you would bet high at 44 for say £2 per point.

Here are the results of Spencer's six rides:

  • Race 1 Unplaced (0 points)
  • Race 2 Unplaced (0)
  • Race 3 3rd (5)
  • Race 4 1st (25)
  • Race 5 Unplaced (0)
  • Race 6 1st (25)

Total = 55 points

With these results had you gone high at 44 you would have won 11 times your stake: (55 - 44) x your stake =11 x £2 = £22. But, if Jamie Spencer had only managed one winner and failed to make the frame on the other five rides, the make-up would be 25 points which, with the same bet, would have lost you 19 times you stake: (25 - 44) x your stake = 19 x £2 = -£38.

Cricket

Cricket is another hugely popular sport with spread bettors. We offer a wide variety of markets on Cricket relating to runs, wickets, win indices and individual player performances. These markets are available across all forms of cricket from T20 to five day tests.

With a win index you can bet on how an individual team will perform. We award 25 points to the winning team, 10 points to both teams for a draw and 0 points for a loss. We also offer markets on how individual players will perform and you can back these players to do well or badly.

So as you can see, with cricket we offer so much more variety than just backing a team to win. Below are detailed bet explanations of our most popular cricket markets.

Cricket - Individual Batsman Series Runs

This market allows you to be with or against a individual batsmen throughout a Test series. If you believe someone will score more runs than our prediction you buy (go high) at the higher level of our prediction. If you think an individual will struggle and make fewer runs than our projection you sell (go low) at the lower level of the prediction.

Here's an example. In a typical three match Test Series, we might predict that Ian Bell will score 200-210 runs. If you believed Bell would score more than that in the three matches you might bet high at 210 for the stake of your choice, in this case, say £2 a run. If Bell notches up innings of 46, 59, 21, 23, 0 and 101 in the three Tests, his total runs would have added up to 250. Had you gone high at 210 you would have made 40 times your stake: (250 - 210) x your stake = 40 x £2 = £80. But if he had only managed a total of 180 runs, the same bet would have lost you 30 times your stake: (180 - 210) x your stake = -30 x £2 = -£60.

Cricket - Individual Bowler Series Wickets

This is a market predicting the number of wickets an individual bowler will take in a series.

We might reckon that Graeme Swann would take 18 wickets in a five-match Test series against the Australians. As a result our prediction would be 17-19. If you believed he would struggle to take wickets, you would bet low at 17 for the stake of your choice, in this case, say £5 a wicket. Had Swann tormented the Aussies for the 5 games and taken 5, 8, 3, 5 and 2 wickets respectively, his series total would have been 23. Had you gone low at 17 you would have lost 6 times your stake of £5: (17 - 23) x your stake = -6 x £5 = -£30. However, had you gone high at 19 you would have won 4 times your stake: (23 -19) x your stake = 4 x £5 = £20.

Cricket - Highest Innings Score and Lowest Innings Score

These two markets are based on the highest/lowest number of runs either side will score in an innings during the course of a Test Series.

Let's look at an illustration. At the start of an England v West Indies Test series, we might reckon that the highest innings score would be 480 and therefore set our spread at 470-490. If you believed that the majority of pitches would be batsmen friendly, you would bet high at 490 for the stake of your choice, in this case perhaps £2 a run.

If England notched 530 in the first Test and this had proved to be the highest total of the series, this bet would have rewarded you with 40 times your stake: (530 - 490) x your stake = 40 x £2 = £80. However, had the batsmen struggled throughout the series and the highest total only been 440, you would have lost 50 times your stake. 440 - 490 x your stake = -50 x £2 = -£100.

The same principle applies for lowest innings score.

Cricket - In Play Win Index

This market awards 25 points to the winning team of a test match, 10 points to both teams for a draw and 0 points for a loss. You can bet on either team to perform better or worse than our prediction. This market is updated as the match progresses.

For example at the start of a Test match between England and New Zealand, we might price England at 16-17.5 on the Win Index. Put another way we have them as strong favourites to win the match.

If you thought England could justify this favouritism you would bet high at 17.5 for your chosen stake, in this case, £10 a point. If England confirmed your view and went on to win the match they would have been awarded 25 points and New Zealand 0 points. Had you gone high at 17.5 you would have made 7.5 times your stake: (25 - 17.5) x your stake = 7.5 x £10 = £75. However had you gone low on England at 16 then you would have lost 9 times your stake: (16 - 25) x your stake = 9 x £10 = -£90.

New Zealand, on the other hand, might have been priced at 5-6.5 at the start of the same Test. If you had gone high at 6.5 it would be important to note that both a draw and a New Zealand win would be profitable for you.

Cricket - Total Runs In An Innings

This market based around the prediction of the number of runs each side will score in an individual innings.

Say England win the toss and elect to bat at the Oval. We might forecast the total number of runs they score as 320, and as a result our prediction would be 315-325. If you believed that England would score heavily, you would bet high on their first innings score at 325 for your chosen stake, in this case, you plump for £2 a run. If England had scored 405 in their first innings, you would have won 80 times your stake: (405 - 325) x your stake = 80 x 2 = £160. But if you thought England would have another one of their spectacular collapses you might bet low at 315. In this case England's first innings score would have lost 90 times your stake: (405 - 315) x your stake = 90 x £2 = -£180.

Cricket - Individual Batsman's Runs In An Innings

During the course of an innings we will predict the number of runs a batsman will score.

Here's an example. As Kevin Pietersen walks to the wicket we might be predicting he will score 30-34 runs. If you thought he was in good form you would bet high at 34 for your chosen stake, in this case, £5 a run. Had Peterson scored 52 you would have made 18 times your stake: (52 - 34) x your stake = 18 x £5 = £90.

But if he had struggled and eventually been dismissed for 16, you would have lost 18 times your stake: (16 - 34) x your stake = -18 x £5 = -£90.

Cricket - Fall Of Next Wicket

This market gives you the opportunity to challenge our prediction of the score when the next wicket falls.

Here's an illustration. With England at 70 for 2 on a seaming pitch, we might forecast that the fall of the next wicket will be approximately 30 runs later. As a result our prediction would have been 98 - 102.

If you believed England would consolidate and build a decent third wicket partnership, you would bet high (buy) at 102 runs, for the stake of your choice, say £5 a run. However, if England lost their third wicket the very next ball with the score still on 70 you would have lost 32 times your stake: (70 - 102) x your stake = -32 x £5 = -£160. On the other hand had England put on 62 for the third wicket, you would have made 30 times your stake: (132 - 102) x your stake = 30 x £5 = £150.

Cricket - Session Runs

For this market we predict the number of runs that will be scored in each session of a typical Test Match. Take an example of the opening day of a Test between England and Sri Lanka. We might predict that 78 - 82 runs will be scored in the second session of play (Lunch until Tea). With the lunchtime score at 70 for 1 and the weather set fair, you may believe that batting would become easier in the second session, so might bet high at 82, for the stake of your choice, in this case, £5 a run. If 102 runs were scored in the second session you would have been proved right. Had you gone high at 82 you would have won 20 times your stake: (102 - 82) x your stake, 20 x 5 = £100. However, had a couple of wickets fallen and only 70 runs been scored in the 2nd session, you would have lost 12 times your stake: (70 - 82 x your stake = -12 x £5 = -£60.

Golf

With spread betting on golf you can back golfers to do well or badly against the entire field, a select group of other golfers or just against one other individual. This makes it easier than trolling through a field of 120 golfers to try and find a winner.

With our Leaderboard Index we predict how every golfer will perform and offer points to golfers for finishing in the top eight. In our 18 hole match bets we pick 2 players from the whole field and predict who will win over 18 holes. A player is awarded 10 points for winning the match and 3 for each hole won by.

So as you can see, there¿s plenty of choice when it comes to spread betting on Golf. Much more than just one golfer against the field.

Our bet explanations below will give you the low-down on our most popular markets:

Golf - Tournament Index

In this market we predict how a player will perform in relation to a selected number of his/her competitors (usually 10). It is important to note that only these 10 players count for the bet. As a result your selected player does not necessarily need to win the tournament for your bet to pay out.

In our Tournament Index points are awarded as follows: First of the 10 named players = 50 points, 2nd = 30, 3rd = 20, 4th = 10 and all others = 0.

Here is an illustration. In a typical PGA Tour Tournament, our quote for Phil Mickelson's might be 14-16 in a competitive 10-man index. If you believe that Mickelson would beat the other nine men in the Index, you would buy (go high) at 16 for the stake of your choice, in this case say £5.

If your assessment had proved correct and Mickelson finished top of the ten named players, you would have won 34 times your stake, in this case £5 per point: (50 - 16) x your stake = 34 x £5 = £170 . However, if Mickelson had finished 5th or lower of the 10 named players, he would not have been awarded any points so the same bet would have lost you 16 times your stake: (0 - 16) x your stake = -16 x £5 = -£80.

Golf - Leaderboard Index

In this market we simply predict how well every player will perform in the tournament. The difference between this and our Tournament Index is that every player in the competition counts. The players within the Leaderboard Index correspond with those leading the tournament, so additional players may be priced up as a tournament progresses.

For a typical Leaderboard Index, points are awarded as follows: 1st = 60 points, 2nd = 40, 3rd = 30, 4th = 25, 5th = 20, 6th = 15, 7th = 10, 8th = 5, all others = 0.

For example before the start of a tournament we might predict Ernie Els as winning 10-13 points on the basis of the scoring system above. If you fancied Els to do better than 6th (15 points) you would bet high at 13 for the stake of your choice, in this case say £5.

Had he ended up finishing 4th (25 points) you would have made 12 times your stake: (25 - 13) x Your Stake = 12 x £5 = £60. However, if he had struggled with his game and eventually missed the cut, he would have received 0 points on the Leaderboard Index. As a result you would have lost 13 times your stake: (0 - 13) x your stake = -13 x £5 = -£65.

Golf - Live Index

During the final round of most televised tournaments we offer live prices as the action unfolds. Therefore you have the opportunity to outwit our market makers as each shot is hit. The scoring system awards points as follows: 1st = 25 points, 2nd = 10, 3rd = 5, all others = 0.

Here's an example. In the British Open we might offer predictions for eight players in contention during the last round live on TV. Walking off the 15th green, after a birdie to bring him within two shots of the leader, we might price Luke Donald at 7-9 points. If on the 16th hole his drive went into the water and the prospect of him dropping a shot looked highly likely, we might revise our quote downwards on him to 3 - 6. Having followed the action closely on TV, you might believe that the situation isn't as bad for Donald as it appears, and in fact Vijay may well be able to rescue a par at the 16th. As a result you might decide to place your bet high at 6, for the stake of your choice, in this case say £10 a point.

If Donald did drop a shot at the 16th but managed to keep his composure and finish second in the tournament, he would have been awarded 10 points in our Live Index. As a result you would have made 4 times your stake, in this case £10 per point: (10 - 6) x your stake = 4 x £10 = £40.

However, having seen him find the water, you might have decided that he had little chance of finishing in the top two, and decided to place your bet low at 3. In this scenario, your judgment would have been incorrect and you would have lost 7 times your stake as Donald was awarded 10 points for finishing second: (3 -10) x your stake = -7 x £10 = -£70.

Golf - Finishing Positions

In this market we predict the finishing position a player will achieve at the conclusion of a tournament. We will quote a prediction for a selection of golfers that will reflect how well we think they will fare. Please note that this market differs from many others we offer because you should bet high if you want your selection to do badly, and bet low if you expect him to do well - because the larger the finishing positioning number, the worse a player has performed.

The maximum finishing position is 70, so if someone misses the cut they will be settled at 70.

Let's look at an example. We might predict that Lee Westwood will finish 22nd or 23rd in the US Masters, as a result our quote would be 21-24. If you fancied Westwood to perform well you would bet low on his finishing position at 21. However, had he struggled with his driver and eventually finished 35th, you would have lost 14 times your stake, in this case say £5: (21 - 35) x your stake = -14 x £5 = -£70. However, if you had decided to bet high on his finishing position you would have won 11 times your stake: (35 - 24) x your stake = 11 x £5 = £55.

Golf - 18 Hole Match Bets

Similar to the 72 hole match bet, we offer a large number of 18 hole match bets for each day of most tournaments. We pick two players from the whole field and predict which golfer will win over 18 holes. A player is awarded 10 points for winning plus 3 points for each shot he wins by.

For example, before the first round of a tournament we might offer an 18 Hole Match Bet between Rory McIlroy and Phil Mickelson. Following a recent win we might make McIlroy favourite, with our prediction being 2-5 points. Having watched Love win the week before, you might decide to bet high at 5 for the stake of your choice, in this case say £5 a point.

If Love had shot 68 and Mickelson 70, the result would have been 16 (10 points for Love winning the Match Bet plus 3 points for each shot he won by = 16 points). As a result you would have won 11 times your stake: 16 - 5 x your stake = 11 x £5 = £55. However, had Mickelson shot a 65 and Love only managed a 69, the final make-up would have been -22 (10 points to Mickelson for winning the head-to-head plus 12 points for winning by 4 shots totals 22 points). Had you gone high at 5, you would have lost 27 times your stake, as you lose the 22pts plus the 5 pts you went high at: (-5 -22) x your stake = -27 x £5 = -£125.

Golf - 72 Hole Match Bets

In this market we simply pick two golfers and predict who will finish higher at the end of the tournament. The result is the number of shots that one beats the other by. If either player misses the cut, both players' halfway scores will be doubled. For this bet it does not matter where the two golfers finish in the tournament, or how any other competitors perform, just the two players on which you have placed your bet.

For example, in a 72 Hole Match Bet between Tiger Woods and Lee Westwood we might predict that Westwood would beat Woods by around one shot. As a result our quote would be 0.5-2.0. If you believed that Westwood would continue his good run and that Woods would struggle, you would bet high at 2.0 for the stake of your choice, in this case say £10 per shot.

Had your view been confirmed with Westwood beating Woods by 10 shots (for example Westwood finishing 8 under par while Woods ended 2 over), your online spread bet would have returned 8 times your stake: (10 - 2.0) x your stake = 8 x £10 = £80.

However, had Woods returned to his imperious best and finished on 16 under par and Westwood 10 under par, Woods wins by 6 shots. As a result you would have lost 8 times your stake. As you bought Westwood at 2, you lose two points plus what Woods won by. Here's the calculation: (-2.0 - 6) x your stake = 8 x £10 = -£80.

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